Acumen

#30DaysofGratitude – Day 20

I’ve mentioned multiple times before, that I am a huge addict of TEDTalks. No surprise then, that a lot of my daily doses of inspiration come from talks that leave a strong mark on my thinking. Yesterday, I heard the TED talk of Raj Panjabi, a physician, social entrepreneur, and winner of the TED Prize in 2017 among many other accolades. His company, Last Mile Health, trains community workers on essential skills that can help them provide lifesaving healthcare to the remotest areas of West Africa. His life’s work is based on one fundamental belief – no one should die because they live far away from a doctor. Such a basic principle, isn’t it ?

My sister, a gynecologist, spent last week working at a government hospital in my hometown – an experience that shook her, as a new doctor entering the real world. She was appalled at the quality of healthcare being provided to pregnant women, the sheer lack of infrastructure and resources, and the callousness it led to, among the doctors and nurses working there. Healthcare in government hospitals is a complicated intertwined system, so I would not be arrogant enough to blame just the doctors – I know they mean well and are not valued enough. But the people at the end of the totem pole are these pregnant women, who, due to the failure of this entire system, just don’t stand a chance to get quality care, let alone survive without complications. People at this hospital die, not because a doctor isn’t available, but because the doctor isn’t able to give them the care they deserve.

As an outsider viewing this system, the critical thing I see is lack of empowerment at every level from hospital management to staff, that cascades down to frustration and therefore, disregard for quality healthcare. On the other hand, what works so beautifully in Last Mile Health is that common people who didn’t even have a stable job, are being empowered with these medical skills that help them make a difference in the lives of others. They are more invested in what they do, not just because it provides them with a means to improve their own lives, but also gain satisfaction from serving others.

This idea so beautiful in theory, but even as I think about how it might apply to the healthcare system in India, I feel helpless – can I change this? if yes, what is my next step? am I being too idealistic? what are the ugly truths I am not seeing yet? One of the first lessons we were taught as Acumen Fellows was to be comfortable with the questions. Seems like a sucky lesson to be taught, right now! (sorry Acumen)

The thing that inspired me the most about Raj Panjabi’s TED talk was the way his face lit up, when talking about his company and his people and the impact they are having. It was not grandiose, but rather, the kind of humble satisfaction you feel after having scaled a massive mountain – taking just a moment to acknowledge the days of arduous climbs behind you, and knowing there are tougher mountains to scale in the future. That look right there, is what I aspire to.

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